“Vibrations”: The Golgotha ​​of an Oppressed Family Leader in Guatemala’s Religious Regression

40-YEAR-OLD PABLO knew it was not easy to choose, but he may not have expected the punishment to be so severe. When one rainy night he announces to his parents and his beautiful wife that he is gay and loves another man, a small earthquake, from those who typically vibrate Guatemala, advocates for the crack that breaks a weak bond.

Pablo comes from a good family, works as a counselor and at the same time is a pastor in the form of evangelists. His grandfather, along with a shrewd colleague, maintain a church with believers and specialize in bringing sinners together, bringing them before their spiritual responsibilities.

Pablo’s legacy is heavy, as is his choice to become a father of two, always belonging to a conservative hearth. In love with his masseur, Francisco, who moves to the drunken fringe with relative dignity, has no choice but to leave voluntarily and live with him, in a passing house, far from the luxury he has enjoyed so far.

His wife visits him and tries to persuade him. She talks to him about his embarrassing slip but explodes when she sees two toothbrushes in the bathroom – she is definite, she thinks, and irreversibly, she is scared. He forbids him to see the children, and a little later the news travels and he is fired from the strict regulations of his work with concise procedures and with the gratuitous concession not to find out the real reason. The bonds are severed and she is left alone, a man deeply divided, sad and gloomy, with his sexual encounter giving way to an act of unacknowledged desire, instead of ending in a love affair.

Guatemala is not only the proud homeland of the Mayans, but an expanding incubator of all deviations from the Christian faith, from Catholicism to evangelicals, with many sects in between.

Despite Francisco’s efforts, Pablo’s path is an ever-narrowing one, with the precipice of the forbidden new identity on the one hand and the stream of his submission on the other.

At Vibrations, which have just premiered on the Cinobo subscription platform, Pablo is afraid of his desires, he closes in on himself as longingly. Towards the end he trembles at the idea of ​​the effects it causes. Everyone is reflected on him and he carries them speechless.

“Of course it is difficult to be a sister here, we are not in Luxembourg,” Francisco replies. In his second film, after his debut with Volcano, Jairo Bustamande never loses the personal compass of the tortured protagonist, as long as he tries to compose the social conditions that internally hinder, albeit brutally, the blunted happiness he seeks even in the middle of his life.

Guatemala is not only the proud homeland of the Mayans, but an expanding incubator of all deviations from the Christian faith, from Catholicism to evangelicals, with many sects in between. Immersed in beliefs and doctrines, Guatemala pique Bustamande’s interest: through the seemingly rational, certainly successful, noble and completely compromising Pablo, a society stuck in a dead end at stake is at stake.

“Deny it, you can definitely lie,” his father advises his misguided son as soon as he regains his composure at the beginning of the film. The Tremors, which of course has nothing to do with the eponymous cheap thrills American film with its many sequels, from 1990 until today, is essentially the portrait of a society that threatens with spiritual – which is often more insidiously effective than legal – correction as many children try to live truly.

It is a country sandwiched among its most fancy and rich in human and narrative material – and perhaps that is one serious reason we know so little about it.

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